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Cumulative HIV Viremia Copy-Years and Hypertension in People Living with HIV

Author(s):

Yunan Xu*, Xinguang Chen, Akemi Wijayabahu, Zhi Zhou, Bin Yu, Emma C. Spencer and Robert L. Cook   Pages 1 - 11 ( 11 )

Abstract:


Background: Evidence regarding the association between HIV viral load (VL) and hypertension is inconsistent. In this study, we investigated the relationship using viremia copy-years (VCY), a cumulative measure of HIV plasma viral burden.

Methods: Data were analyzed for 686 PLWH in the Florida Cohort Study who had at least five years of VL data before the baseline. VL data were extracted from Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS) and used to define peak VL (pVL), recent VL (rVL), and undetectable VL (uVL: rVL<50copies/mL). A five-year VCY (log10 copy × years/mL) before the baseline investigation was calculated and divided into 5 groups (<2.7, 2.7-3.7. 3.8-4.7, 4.8-5.7 and >5.7) for analysis. Hypertension was determined based on hypertension diagnosis from medical records. Multivariable logistic regression was used for association analysis.

Results: Of the total sample, 277 (40.4%) participants were hypertensive. Compared to the participants with lowest VCY (<2.7 log10 copy × years/mL), the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for hypertension of the remaining four groups, in order, were 1.91 [1.11, 3.29], 1.91 [1.03, 3.53], 2.27 [1.29, 3.99], and 1.25 [0.65, 2.42], respectively, controlling for confounders. The association was independent of pVL, rVL, and uVL, each of which was not statistically significant associations with hypertension.

Conclusion: Persistent HIV infection is a risk factor for hypertension among PLWH. Information provided by VCY is more effective than single time-point VL measures in investigating HIV infection-hypertension relationship. Findings of this study support the significance of continuous viral suppression in hypertension prevention among PLWH.

Keywords:

cumulative viremia, copy-years, hypertension, HIV, viral load, virological suppression

Affiliation:

Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Bureau of Communicable Diseases, HIV/AIDS Section, Tallahassee, Florida, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



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