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Antiviral Activity of Fecal Water Samples from HIV-1 Infected Subjects Treated with a Specific Probiotic Formulation

[ Vol. 17 , Issue. 3 ]

Author(s):

Francesca Falasca, Eugenio Nelson Cavallari, Giuseppe Pietro Innocenti, Carolina Scagnolari, Ivano Mezzaroma, Letizia Santinelli, Giancarlo Ceccarelli, Vincenzo Vullo, Ombretta Turriziani and Gabriella d'Ettorre*   Pages 183 - 189 ( 7 )

Abstract:


Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate if the supplementation with multistrain probiotics may be able to modulate T cell response in HIV-1 infected patients and to evaluate the anti-HIV activity of probiotic by studying fecal water (FW) samples.

Methods: Three HIV-1-positive patients (Pt1, Pt2 and Pt3) on long-term suppressive combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) received a specific multi-strain probiotic supplementation (Vivomixx ®), for six months (T6). Levels of T cell subsets were evaluated by flow cytometry. Anti- HIV activity of FW samples was evaluated in vitro.

Results: CD4+ T cells levels increased in all HIV-1 infected patients whereas activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR) were decreased both on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. FW samples presented an increased inhibitory activity against HIV-1 compared to T0 (FW-Pt1: T0 =40%, T6 = 65% of reduction; FW Pt2: T0 = 26%, T6 = 46% of reduction; FW Pt3: T0 = 47%, T6 = 94% of reduction).

Discussion: Our data suggest that the administration of the specific probiotic formulation improves the antiviral status of people living with HIV-1 under cART, also modulating T cell response.

Conclusion: Anti-HIV activity of FW may have several public health and social implications for sexually transmitted diseases that need to be further explored.

Keywords:

HIV-1, probiotics, fecal water, viral replication, immune activation, cART.

Affiliation:

Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Translational and Precision Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome

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