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PrEP Eligibility and Interest Among Clinic- and Community-Recruited Young Black Women in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

[ Vol. 16 , Issue. 3 ]

Author(s):

J.M. Sales*, R.J. Steiner , J.L. Brown, A. Swartzendruber , A.S. Patel and A.N. Sheth   Pages 250 - 255 ( 6 )

Abstract:


Background: Atlanta has been identified as an HIV “hot spot” for Black women and ranks 5th in the US with new infections. Yet little is known about PrEP eligibility or interest among young Black women in Atlanta.

Methods: A convenience sample of 1,261 Black women (ages 14-24 years) were recruited from two settings: community venues and sexual health clinics. They provided self-reported sexual behavior data and specimens for laboratory testing for chlamydia (CT) and gonorrhea (GC) infections. For each woman, the number of key self-reported behavioral HIV risk factors was calculated (0-6 factors for the clinic sample, 0-3 factors for the community sample). A single item assessed PrEP interest in the community sample only.

Results: Bacterial STI positivity, an indicator for PrEP eligibility, was 20.5% (17.1% CT, 6.3% GC) and 20.9% (18.8% CT, 5.2% GC) for the clinic and community samples, respectively. Of the 144 STI positive women from the clinic sample, 20.1% reported no behavioral risk indicators and 47.2% reported > 2 behavioral indicators. Of the 117 STI positive women from the community sample, 21.4% reported no behavioral risk indicators. 60.7% of the community sample reported they would be likely or very likely to use PrEP if available.

Conclusion: Young Black women in Atlanta, whether sampled from community or sexual health settings, are at substantial risk for HIV infection and meet several PrEP eligibility criteria. Scaling up PrEP among women in Atlanta could have significant implications for HIV in this high burden region.

Keywords:

PrEP, women, Black or African American, United States, chlamydia, gonorrhea.

Affiliation:

Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30322, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30322, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322

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